What Types of Gimbals Exist?

If you've ever seen footage shot with a handheld camera, you know that the movement of the camera as one holds it in one's hands and moves around with it can result in shakiness and blurriness. Sometimes this is done purposely for dramatic effect, but if you prefer to shoot smooth, professional-looking video while not sacrificing mobility, a gimbal is a tool that can help, and there are several types of gimbals to choose from.

A gimbal looks like a series of rings rotating around a single axis. Anything that is mounted to the innermost gimbal will remain still and steady despite any shaking or pitching movements. If your camera is mounted to the innermost axis of the gimbal, it will record smooth video without shakiness even when it is in motion. Camera gimbals come in two basic varieties: two-axis and three-axis. The three-axis gimbal offers more stability than the two-axis type.

Because there are different types of cameras that are used to record video, there are also different gimbals available to work with them. Amateurs and professionals alike are increasingly using smartphones to shoot video, and the market has responded with the relatively new introduction of gimbals to use with your Android or iPhone device. A more traditional choice for shooting video is DSLR cameras of both mirrorless and mirrored varieties, and there are both large and small gimbals compatible with this type of camera available. There are also handheld gimbals available to work with action cameras like a GoPro.

Camera gimbals allow you to take your camera anywhere and capture smooth, clear video without shaking or blurring. You can then enhance your project even further with quality stock footage from Shutterstock. We offer a wide variety of professional-grade royalty-free video clips, which we continually update on a weekly basis.


 
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