These creative print ads highlight the depth of the Shutterstock collection, the freshness of its images, and the speed at which you can find them.

Diego Tuya, the executive creative director of Mercardo McCann, talks about what inspired the team — comprised of Juan Ignacio Goldsztein (copywriter), Pablo Cominetti (art director), and Agustin Borgognoni (producer) — to create their “Shapes” campaign for Shutterstock. This campaign recently won a 2018 Cannes Lions Best Print Campaign award — the Lions are among the world’s preeminent honors for excellence in creative marketing communications.

“Shapes” Advertising Campaign Wins Best Print Campaign at Cannes Lions — Rectangle

Shutterstock: What was the brief?

Diego Tuya: Shutterstock wanted to attract creative agencies, while showcasing its unique creative platform and really stand out in a way that would appeal to this audience.

Shutterstock: How did you approach the brief?

Tuya: As a creative agency ourselves, we knew that the idea of a large, ever-growing creative platform like Shutterstock is essential to the work we do. It acts not only as an important resource for images and footage, but also it provides a platform to help agencies in their search for inspiration and new ideas. Over 1.5 million images are being added every week; you can find anything on Shutterstock, from the inspiring and breathtaking to the funny and strange. That was the inspiration point, and we thought that it was only natural to take this concept of “speed” — speed of new images being added and speed of being able to find them on the site, both incredibly valuable assets for creative agencies.

“Shapes” Advertising Campaign Wins Best Print Campaign at Cannes Lions — Triangle

Shutterstock: What was the biggest challenge you faced?

Tuya: Once we knew where we wanted to take the idea, we needed to find a unique and relevant point of view. We really needed to stand out from the crowd and come up with a striking and impactful way to tell our story that would stop creatives in their tracks and make them look deeper into the image. Something they could get lost in, the more you looked at it the more you saw, but also making it simple and eye-catching in a glance.

Shutterstock: What surprised you during the process?

Tuya: I think during the discovery stage searching through Shutterstock’s collections to create the print ads, we were all constantly surprised to see the quality and authentically shot images that you wouldn’t associate with a typical “stock” image. There was an amazing array of images. During this process we also discovered Shutterstock’s curated section called “Offset,” where every image is exceptional, highly produced, and each one tells a powerful story,